The benefits of omega-3 fatty acids (DHA and EPA) start at the cellular level

  • Fatty acids are derived from medium-chain triglycerides and long-chain triglycerides (MCTs and LCTs)
  • When hydrolyzed, LCTs yield omega-3 fatty acids, which benefit human health1
    • LCTs are the ONLY source of omega-3 fatty acids

Omega-3 fatty acids strengthen the development and functioning of organs at the cellular level

Brain and retina2-4
Have highly specialized functional roles in normal signal transduction, neurotransmission, and neurogenesis

Cardiovascular system5
Help lower blood pressure and improve blood vessel function

Play a key role in numerous metabolic processes1,6
In addition to acting as a source of energy

Throughout the body1,3
Are released from membranes by phospholipases for conversion to mediate immune function, platelet aggregation, and lipid homeostasis

Omega-3 fatty acids can ease inflammation before it causes widespread damage to the body2

  • DHA and EPA may have clinically important anti-inflammatory effects in a variety of conditions associated with fat malabsorption2
  • A balanced ratio of omega-6 to omega-3 fatty acids is beneficial in maintaining normal development, immunological function, and overall health

Fats can increase caloric uptake and, when compared with proteins and carbohydrates, are a greater source of calories (cal) (9 kcal/gram vs 4 kcal/gram for proteins and carbohydrates)7

DHA=docosahexaenoic acid.
EPA=eicosapentaenoic acid.

    REFERENCES
  1. National Institutes of Health Website. Omega-3 fatty acids: fact sheet for professionals. https://ods.od.nih.gov/factsheets/omega3FattyAcids-HealthProfessional/. Accessed October 16, 2017.
  2. Calder PC. Omega-3 fatty acids and inflammatory processes. Nutrients. 2010;2:355-374.
  3. Abedi E, Sahari MA. Long-chain polyunsaturated fatty acid sources and evaluation of their nutritional and functional properties. Food Sci Nutr. 2014;2(5):443-463.
  4. Uauy R, Mena P, Rojas C. Essential fatty acids in early life: structural and functional role. Proc Nutr Soc. 2000;59(1):3-15.
  5. Harvard School of Public Health Website. The Nutrition Source. Omega-3 fatty acids: an essential contribution. https://www.hsph.harvard.edu/nutritionsource/omega-3-fats/. Accessed October 16, 2017.
  6. Prentice AM, Paul AA. Fat and energy needs of children in developing countries. Am J Clin Nutr. 2000;72(5):1253S-1265S.
  7. Cleveland Clinic Website. Fat and calories. https://my.clevelandclinic.org/health/articles/fat-and-calories. Accessed October 16, 2017.
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